DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow

I won’t even attempt to play the rockstar-time-management card today. We’re struggling over here y’all.

Between Robert being swamped with work at the office, family events all over the calendar, and continuous running around, the big home improvement projects have been on the back burner lately. (We now have a farmhouse kitchen sink sitting in storage waiting to be installed right now, and I can barely stand it! Eek!)

I wouldn’t trade this busy, fun, creative life for anything, but let’s just say it was amazing to somehow finish this little craft yesterday that I’m about to show y’all.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

For over a year, I’ve had this idea to make a vintage botanical print pillow inspired by this one I spotted at Magnolia Market. It was so sweet and simple and perfect for spring; although, I’d keep it around any time of year really.

But… it was $98. And even if I’d planned on spending $98 on a pillow, it’s out of stock right now anyway.

So, I attempted my own Joanna Gaines inspired version. I’m sure hers would still be way more fabulous, but this gave me my fix.

Supplies used:  (Affiliate links are provided below. For more information, see my full disclosure here.)

Honestly, if you were to buy all of those items just for this one specific project to only make one pillow, you’d be better off just buying a similar version in a store somewhere for around $35. But since I already had almost all of the supplies already in my stash (hello, my name is Lauren and I’m a craft hoarder), it was well worth it.

I try to come up with projects based on what I already have before I run out to buy more at the craft store, so this was one of those mostly “leftovers” type of projects.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

There are multiple methods to transfer images to fabric out there, but I’d never been super successful with any of them before, so I wanted to try the Fusion Transfer Gel. I’d used it on wood before but never fabric.

I will say though, you might want to stick to white canvas like I did since the gel may possibly leave a white ring on other colors.

For it to work though, you need to use an image printed from a laser printer, which I don’t have. I sent off my four botanical graphics to have printed at Staples instead for a total of 30 cents.

When I got the prints home, I trimmed the edges and decided on their placement on the pillow cover.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

For the Transfer Gel step, I just followed the directions on the back of the bottle. Use your craft brush to spread the gel on the front of the cover as if you are painting it. Place your paper, print side down, on top of the transfer gel you just applied. Then, smooth it out. I used an old credit card to press out any air bubbles underneath the paper.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

At this point, go distract yourself because you have to wait about 16-24 hours for the transfer gel to work. It’s worth it though, I promise! Have a Netflix binge on Friends re-runs. (I mean… that’s what I do anyway.)

After 24 hours, run your paper pieces that are still stuck to your pillow cover under a faucet and get them soaking wet. Then, lay it on a flat surface and use your finger tips or a cloth to rub away the layer of paper. Keep wetting the paper as it dries and continue to remove it. You can scrub it a little with a rough sponge too, but be careful not to scrub away your transferred graphic.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

Once the paper is all rubbed away, hang up the pillow cover to dry. You can finish it with a little clear soft wax too if you want. I sprayed mine with Scotch Guard to help protect it. (Three year-old on the loose around here, y’all. Beware.)

I wanted to add some wording, so I used a laminated burlap sheet to run through my printer. I just typed it up in PicMonkey using the font “Special Elite”.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

I cut out the burlap wording, and since I have an aversion to sewing, I attached it to the pillow cover using the Heat n Bond tape and a hot iron.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

I stuffed it with an insert and it was done! It really wasn’t hard at all, just a lot of waiting time while the magic happened.

I love the saying on it, “He said there are always flowers for those who want to see them.” I think we always need that reminder, don’t you? Always look for the flowers even on the coldest, dreariest days.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

You could definitely do any kind of graphic for any kind of decor you want, but I have a major crush on botanicals, especially during the spring and summer months. I still have enough materials and transfer gel leftover to make about 6 more. Yay! Maybe in the fall and winter I’ll try it out again with a different graphic.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

So now our entryway still has the Irish Blessing love happening, but our single pillow doesn’t look so lonely anymore.

DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this. DIY Vintage Botanical Print Pillow | blesserhouse.com - This is so cute! There are so many different types of pillows you could make doing this.

What do you think? Cute? I think I’m ready to find other ways to transfer graphics on things. I’ve always failed miserably at it before now.

P.S. Thank you guys SO much for your input on some of the kitchen choices we’ve been making lately. I finally have the vision more clearly in my head and I’m so excited to see how it’s going to turn out.

P.P.S. A couple office changes are being wrapped up now that I can’t wait to show you guys.

P.P.P.S. The master bedroom is stuck in limbo while we wait on a project supply that’s been backordered. That room mocks me. So close!

P.P.P.S. How many P.S.es can you have at the end of a post before it gets ridiculous? Four, apparently.

signoff

Follow:

Facebook | Pinterest | Instagram | Twitter | Google+

Similar Posts

40 Comments

      1. Thanks Lauren! I have another question. Do you think a laser image could printed on a transparency then transferred to fabric with the Fusion product? Thanks again! Jo

  1. I would like to use a photo from this blog posts on The Graphics Fairy blog. It uses one of our images on a pillow with a transfer method using Fusion Mineral Transfer Medium. I am reviewing the product for TGF. Please!!

  2. I have a laser printer, so black and white is the only kind of transfer I’ve done. I’ve used Citrisolv, but the gel is new to me. I like the sharpness it gave your pillow. Citrisolv is more of a soft image.

    I recognized the images you used right away (I’m a big Graphics Fairy fan) and I love poppies. I also love botanicals in my home. Hmm . . . you have me thinking!

    I have a pillow I’ve been thinking to make with a Graphics Fairy image. It has a lot of words, so this gel would be perfect!

    1. Yay! So glad it could give you some ideas, Brandy! I’m a big Graphics Fairy fan too. So many great freebies over there!

    1. Thanks! I’m not sure about the washability since I haven’t done it yet. But I did get it wet without a problem, so you could maybe hand wash it in Woolite? I wouldn’t scrub it or anything though.

    1. Right? It’s beautiful but so not happening in this house. πŸ˜‰ The Transfer Gel worked great for my white canvas fabric. Since it’s white already, I don’t know if it would really work on any other colors though.

  3. I really do enjoy your humor and the botanical pillow is very pretty. Now if I can get up enough nerve to try it, I will become a believer also. I haven’t had much luck with this sort of project before, so I am looking forward to trying this method….looks to be a winner! Thank you!

    1. Aw thanks, Char! You’re so sweet. πŸ™‚ I hadn’t had much luck with this sort of project before either. The trick with the transfer gel I’d say is to stick to using white canvas. Not sure how it would turn out on other fabrics. Hope you go for it!

    1. Thanks so much for the share, friend! I need to go back and add that it’s really best to use on white canvas. I’m not sure how it would do on other fabrics.

  4. I love the pillows. Just could not be prettier.
    Yes we do need to be reminded to look for the flowers in everything. Sometimes hard to see but they are there at the perfect time.

    1. Thanks, Caitlin! My craft supply stash is way too big. Maybe this project was more like my sign that I need help. πŸ˜‰

      1. Do you have some Omni Gel in your stash (instead of the one used here)? I haven’t done fabric transfers before but I like using O.G. on other surfaces. Any feedback?

  5. Just about to undertake your tea/apple cider stain project for a wall at a lake house – Did you put any polyurethane or sealer over your pieces in your bathroom –

    1. Hi, Mary! Yes, I put a marine grade polyurethane on top of the stain to seal out moisture. That’s definitely an important step. Hope it turns out well for you! πŸ™‚

  6. Very cute Lauren! I see these image transfer projects and graphics and think to myself, “If only my printer would cooperate.” It never dawned on me to have them printed at Staples! What a great idea!

    P.S. Love your entryway.

    1. Thanks, Lori! I think that’s why these types of projects never worked for me either. A laser printer must be the key ingredient there. I just never knew it before.

        1. Hi Renee! I used a public domain image, and unfortunately, the original print is in black and white. But you can always Google public domain botanical graphics to find others like it in color. πŸ™‚

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.