| |

How to Hang Decor on Siding

A quick tip for how to hang decor on vinyl siding without damage.

The other day, when I shared our big (well, technically little) patio reveal, I got LOTS of messages in my inbox with the same question: How did you hang decor on siding?

So, apparently it was worthy of a whole ‘nother post. But it’s easy peasy.

(Affiliate links are provided below for convenience. For more information, see my full disclosure here.)

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

All you need are these vinyl siding clips.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

It took some muscle to separate our siding far enough to wiggle them in there, but it was still quick and fairly easy.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

They can’t hold 100 pounds or anything crazy, but they have been great so far for holding up this pair of metal trough boxes that I got from Curtis Creation for my herb garden.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

To attach them to the hooks, I just used an old wire coat hanger to loop through the screw holes in my boxes, twist, and hang them up.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

The little hooks made it really easy to string our outdoor lights to the corner of our house too.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

The only bummer is the hooks only work if you have vinyl siding that can be separated. If you have wood siding, that is completely attached to your house, they won’t work.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

So far, they have been awesome and haven’t caused any damage to our siding at all.

I’m glad that little wall on our patio isn’t so naked looking anymore, and I can just step out of the back door and snip some herbs from those trough shelves whenever I feel like tossing some into my cooking.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

Oh, and I didn’t mention it before but you see our “table” right there with the lemonade pitcher on top? That’s a planter that we use as our rustic “tree skirt” at Christmas. It’s a nice parking spot for that barrel until December rolls around again. Last time I was in the garden department at Lowe’s, there were still plenty of them there.

Do you have any outdoor decorating hacks of your own? Have you hung any decor on your siding before? I’m thinking I’ll end up using these little hooks on other places of our exterior too.

If you missed our backyard patio reveal, you can check out the entire post and all of the sources here.

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

And if you ever need to come back to this post later, you can pin it here:

How to Hang Decor on Siding With No Damage | blesserhouse.com - Good tip for making outdoor siding look not so naked!

signoff

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

28 Comments

  1. It is so funny that I happened across your post about these siding clips….(while taking a break from the aggravating task of removing staples from wood trim on front porch before the sweltering October New Orleans heat curbs my outdoor stamina). I have had these on my “wish list” for awhile. What I really love are your herb planters…I have been trying to figure out what to do with some “bread boxes” with broken lids…”why are your saving these?” the husband keeps asking…your photo has inspired a use for something that was headed for the recycle bin. Thanks for the great idea! 🙂

  2. Lauren, I love how you decorated your small patio … it looks very cosey … I bought a large metal welcome sign at JoAnn’s last week at 70% off plus a 15% off total sale for our front porch … I too am very lucky to have a handy husband … I wanted to hang it on an empty wall on the porch so my husband first took 2 fish eye hooks and screwed them into a trim board at the top of the siding and then he took 2 more and attached them to the flat upper side of the sign … he then used a thick wire similar to a metal clothes hanger each 28″ long & making a hook at each end to attach to the eye hooks … the straight metal wire keeps it from swinging a lot in the wind & can easily be taken down later

  3. Oh my gosh I had no idea those clips existed, what a great idea! We have vinyl vertical siding so these clips won’t work for us but its so good to know that they are out there! I’ve been struggling with the idea of putting up window boxes and having to screw through our siding to attach them :/ I just hate to do it! Love that you used metal trough boxes, they look great!

    1. Ah that stinks! So sorry they won’t work for you. I wonder if there is something similar out there for vertical ones though. I’ll try to keep an eye out. 🙂

  4. Lauren, I love your blog and great ideas like this one.
    For those of us who have brick on our porches and patios, there is a product called brick clips. I have been using these for years. There is a spring mechanism that expands to fit over the brick and the front of the clip has a hanger. They are wonderful and can support a lot of weight.

    1. Good to know! Thanks so much for sharing, Melba! So glad you’re loving my little blog corner over here. 🙂

  5. Old vinyl siding can be very brittle, and even newish siding can be in the cold. Best to do this on a warm day when it is flexible. Of course vinyl siding comes in sections–look for a vertical joint to see where the top of the panel is. Do not try to do this with concrete fiberboard (Hardiboard) or other types of siding. Of course you can just use a pre-drilled hole, a plastic anchor and a screw, perhaps sealed with a bit of caulk, on regular wood siding or wood composite (LP Smartside). Concrete fiberboard requires a masonry drill bit and wear a good dust mask and goggles because the silica dust can be dangerous.