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The Ultimate Closet CleanOut Cheat Sheet

A free printable with the easiest method to help you with closet cleanout to make more space in your wardrobe and leaves you feeling inspired every day.

I know, I know.

I should be sharing our his & her master bedroom closets all finished and filled with our curated wardrobe today. (I’m sorry… I just snort laughed at “curated wardrobe” because seriously many of my clothes have traces of paint splatters. We’re not fancy enough for the word “curated”, okay?)

Robert’s closet is 100% filled and finished and mine is… not. Let’s just say that.

When I shared an update last week, his closet looked like this after our quick IKEA Billy hack:

The Ultimate Closet Cleanout Cheat Sheet | A free printable with the easiest method to help you with closet cleanout to make more space in your wardrobe and leaves you feeling inspired every day.

And now it looks like this: (Sorry for the fuzzy cell phone shot.)

The Ultimate Closet Cleanout Cheat Sheet | A free printable with the easiest method to help you with closet cleanout to make more space in your wardrobe and leaves you feeling inspired every day.

And mine still looks like this:

The Ultimate Closet Cleanout Cheat Sheet | A free printable with the easiest method to help you with closet cleanout to make more space in your wardrobe and leaves you feeling inspired every day.

To be fair, we ran out of hangers. Totally blaming that. Yeah.

But it’s also taken me a lot of time to sort through every piece of clothing. I need way more direction than simply, “Does this spark joy?” when it comes to this closet clean-out thing.

In the past three years, I have been super fit, pregnant, and postpartum with still some baby weight to lose, so my relationship with my wardrobe has been rocky.

And I have a tendency to hang onto way too many clothes simply because they’re still in decent shape, or I keep way too many items “just in case” and that “just in case” moment never arrives.

I’ve finally decided I need to stop playing this back and forth song and dance with my closet, and actually have a closet full of clothes that a truly love and can wear often.

So I whipped up a closet clean-out cheat sheet that has helped to guide me in my thought process.

The Ultimate Closet Cleanout Cheat Sheet | A free printable with the easiest method to help you with closet cleanout to make more space in your wardrobe and leaves you feeling inspired every day.

I think just maybe my Type A is showing. Haha! You do what you gotta do.

It totally works though! And I can honestly say my wardrobe is finally starting to “spark joy” for me… and that hasn’t happened in a very long time.

If you want the closet clean-out cheat sheet yourself, you can subscribe here (it’s free) and get access to it in my printable library. (If you’re already a subscriber, you can access the printable library with the password at the bottom of every email I send.)

I wish I could tell you the closet clean-out process is this neat and tidy…

The Ultimate Closet Cleanout Cheat Sheet | A free printable with the easiest method to help you with closet cleanout to make more space in your wardrobe and leaves you feeling inspired every day.

But no. Reality, y’all.

The Ultimate Closet Cleanout Cheat Sheet | A free printable with the easiest method to help you with closet cleanout to make more space in your wardrobe and leaves you feeling inspired every day.

It’ll get there… eventually.

Seriously though, I can’t wait to show you BOTH of the closets completely finished later this week. Pinky promise, it’ll be done.

Do you have any wardrobe sorting tips you use? Does the “spark joy” method work for you? If it did for me, I would have tossed all of the bills and dirty laundry a long time ago. 😉

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14 Comments

  1. I find one sure decision maker is try it on. What once looked good may not fit like it once did or look good on now. Makes it easier to toss.

  2. “Do you have other similar items that you like better?” If you answer yes, shouldn’t you direct that item to a donate or sell pile? Or choose which one to keep.

  3. I am 81. I put items in a box and then store for three months, If I don’t take anything out in that time I know I don’t need or want it.

  4. Jeanne’s comment struck home with me. I often look at something I am going to give to Goodwill and then think, “If I saw this at Goodwill, I’d BUY it!” Which doesn’t help at all! lol I also try to find places to donate who GIVE the clothes to needy people. That feels better to me to know that someone else will get my stuff and appreciate it. Easier to give it up that way.

  5. I like the printable, but I have one quick question as I don’t under stand the logic of one step in the list. You have the question “Do you have other similar items you like better?” It’s a good question, but on the sheet if the answer is “No” you say put it on the donation pile and keep it for the next question if the answer is yes… Shouldn’t that be the other way round? Donate if you do have similar things you like better and keep if you don’t?

    1. Oh good griefous. You’re totally right. Thank you for catching that! I need to swap the yes and the no. Ack! Going to fix it now. 🙂

  6. I use the smaller thinner hangers and save the wood ones for jackets and heavier clothing. Kudos to Robert for sorting clothes by color. It helps me when trying to put together an outfit, but men never seem to have that problem. Haha.

  7. This is not a new idea but this one works for me. I have my clothes divided by spring/summer and then fall/winter. When I change out my closet I put the hangers in backwards on the rod. Then at the end of the season I get rid of the hangers that are still facing the wrong way because that means I haven’t worn it. Easy Peezy.

  8. Your new closets are beautiful and I need that printable! One thought/tactic that’s helped me whittle down my clothes is to look at an item and ask myself: “If I saw this in a store today would I buy it?”. But I need the more detailed flow sheet- love it!

  9. You are a total inspiration! I have been following you, learning from you and cheering you on for almost a year now. I do so because you keep it real! You are vulnerable and funny! Thank you!

  10. I like to keep a Clean-out bag from ThredUp handy…as I come across anything–belt, shoes, scarf, clothing–from me or mine that is in good shape but I no longer want, into the ThredUp bag it goes. Once full, I seal it up, put it out with the mail for the postman, and order another ThredUp Clean-out bag right away. May not get tons of money, but it is more than just sending to Goodwill and getting nothing. And then I use that money to buy targeted wardrobe items I need off of ThredUp. It has worked really well for me, and even eliminates the “take it to a donation center” step. Win-win!

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