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DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers

Have you seen that Lowe’s commercial lately about gardening skipping a generation? Yeah, I’m that generation.

My dad is the gardening pro, and I kill every single green thing that ever dares to enter our yard.

But he has faith in me and still tries to teach me everything he knows, which is a whoooole lot. When we moved into the new house last month, he and my mom gave Robert and me a stacked herb garden for our backyard as a housewarming gift. It was so darling that it made me really determined to figure out this green thumb thing. (You think he did that on purpose? I think so.)

And then I had the idea to make some cute herb garden markers to go with it. Cute upon cute upon cute! Enter wooden spoons…

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

They have that vintage-y vibe but still only cost around $1 each at the dollar store. Yay!

Olivia was even able to get in on this one, so on one of our rainy days this week, we made it our mommy/daughter crafting project.

Supplies Used: (Affiliate links are provided below for convenience.)

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

Olivia and I just brushed on a coat of the white paint on both sides of the spoons and let dry.

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

Once they dried after about an hour, I used a pencil and a straight edge to draw a straight line on the spoons as a guide for my stamps.

And then stamped away. They don’t have to be perfect at all. Imperfections are part of the charm, right?

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

Since the stamps left a little outline of the squares, I used a small artist brush to put more white paint on top of the marks and pencil line to cover them.

To keep the ink weatherproof, I gave the spoons three light coats of the spray spar urethane and ta da! Easy and pretty herb garden markers.

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

How sweet would these be as table numbers for an outdoor wedding or little favors for a bridal shower?

Oh, and here’s the gardening pro of the family. He found this stacked herb garden at Costco. Guy’s got good taste, don’t ya think?

Last summer, he built a raised bed vegetable garden in our backyard, which did great until a really bad drought hit, and then it didn’t stand much of a chance. I hope I do him proud with this one this time around at least.

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

This is how much growing it’s done in a matter of a few weeks. Looks like maybe I learned a little bit. The constant rain has kinda sorta helped. Ha!

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

Robert and I have been trying to kick our healthy Paleo eating back into high gear now that we’re getting back to normal life from the moving transition. Trekking out to our backyard with Olivia every evening to snip a few herbs for tossing into our dinner has become our new little adventure. She loves walking around smelling all of them.

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

So far, we have basil, oregano, rosemary, sage, thyme, parsley, mint, and spicy oregano (which I’m not brave enough to try yet since I’m a total wimp with the spicy stuff). My dad planted lime basil and chocolate mint too that I can’t wait to try out in a few cocktail recipes this summer. Lime basil mojitos and chocolate mint martinis? Sign me up.

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

Lola is obviously thrilled. “Where’s the beef jerky plant, Mom?”

DIY Wooden Spoon Garden Markers | blesserhouse.com - A simple tutorial for how to craft your own vintage-inspired garden markers made from wooden spoons, plus a resource for a beautiful stacked herb garden.

Do you have any big plans to grow a garden this summer? Or have any gardening tips for total beginners? Do you have any favorite herbs that you love to plant? Or favorite recipes you love tossing herbs into? We have space for a vegetable garden too, but I don’t know if I’m brave enough for that again just yet. Baby steps.

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11 Comments

  1. Try French Tarragon. I use it to make a delicious tarragon butter that we use on chicken & steaks. It’s a perennial, so it will come back next year.

  2. Hello Lauren! I’ve recently discovered your lovely little blog. You are one talented girl & I have so enjoyed looking at your past home but am really, really enjoying seeing what you do to make your new home into your own. It’s fun to see your progress. The blog about gardening really caught my eye. My husband & I are avid gardeners (me-flowers, him-fruit & veggies) & I was immediately smitten w/your picture of the cascading garden boxes. So much so that I just ordered it for my husband’s b-day which is this Friday. He recently has been contemplating planting his herb garden in a different location, so aha! I got this!! ; ) I can’t wait to give it to him!! I have one question though. It looked as though you/your Dad used some sort of landscape fabric inside each tier. Would you mind sharing what you used & how you secured it (staple gun perhaps?) Thank you, in advance, for any info you could provide & also for supplying me w/lots of fun viewing on your blog!! Take care-

  3. Great post, especially for marking various herbs. Sometimes the leaves can be similar and if they aren’t marked, especially in the early stages, it’s easy to forget which one was planted where! Thanks again for the creative idea.

    1. Hi Sue! We just followed the directions in the box. The planter is just a kit. Here’s the link to it: http://amzn.to/2sghxqX It looks like they’ve sold out on Amazon, but my dad bought it at Costco for about $200, if you have a membership there.

    1. Hi! This is Lauren’s mom and I can probably answer this better than Lauren because she is kind of new to this too. Because we live in the South (South Carolina) with mild winters, some of these herbs like rosemary, thyme, and probably the oregano will survive the winter. The basil, parsley and cilantro will get too “leggy” and will die out. The mint, if watered and trimmed back, will survive but it really needs to be in a container by itself (that’s why it is in pots) because it will spread like crazy and take over the whole bed. I hope this helps! Enjoy!

  4. Chives are a really easy perennial herb to grow and they have the prettiest blossom in spring that you can make a flavored vinegar with!

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