|

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash

How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

In good Run-D.M.C. fashion, we got tricky on our kitchen backsplash recently. (Yep. That was an 80s pop reference.)  And Robert and I maybe had that song cranking as we were finishing our latest project.

When we first closed on the house back in the April, our kitchen looked like this. Pretty great already, right?! We’ve been very lucky to have an updated kitchen right from the beginning in this 1960s house. But we felt like we needed to make some tweaks…

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

We have a lot of plans to make this kitchen more our style over the next year or two. Maybe change the tile floor, do something with that shamrock cut-out built-in shelf, and I’m a tad tempted to paint the cabinets (which is probably nuts since I was all ga-ga for a white kitchen in the last house… seriously, who am I?)

But that’s all way down the road in more of a Phase 2 for this space.

So for now, Phase 1:  the backsplash.

UPDATE: See our completed budget-friendly kitchen refresh here!

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

It’s not that there was anything wrong with the backsplash on its own, but I felt like it was a bit busy with the granite countertops. The colors and texture and pattern weren’t doing it for me.

So until we actually get to Phase 2 of this kitchen and take a chisel to this tile to remove it for good, Robert and I decided on a quick fix for now. Enter pressed “tin” panels.

Normally, pressed tin is placed on ceilings, but we thought the white PVC kind looked a lot like tile. And best of all, it was inexpensive and suuuper quick to do! Plus, it didn’t even require a single power tool. Win-win-win!

Supplies Used:  (Some affiliate links are provided below for convenience.)

The whole project cost us all of $104 and 6 hours to do it. Not quite as cheap or as quick as our last faux brick whitewashed backsplash in the old house. But still… Score!

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

The Steps:

  1.  To make sure the blue/gray tiles wouldn’t show through the white panels, I painted the tiles, first, with a coat of the white primer.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

2. The panels come in 2’x4′ sheets, so we had to work in sections, starting on one end of the backsplash. (We chose the corner of our kitchen that is least noticeable while we figured things out in case of any rookie mistakes.)

We measured the first section and then marked a panel using a pencil and a square tool to ensure a straight cut.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

3. To cut it, we only needed a utility knife with a sharp blade. (Make sure to have a piece of cardboard underneath your panel so you don’t cut into your table.)

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

4. Once our panel piece had been cut for the section, we measured and marked where any switch plates, outlets, and under mount lighting would go. Then, cut those out with the utility knife too. This was definitely the trickiest part and took a little time to figure out, so buying an extra panel in case of a measuring/cutting mistake is a good idea.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

5. To adhere the panels to the existing tile, we only needed a little construction adhesive applied on the back and pressed into place. The panels come with instructions for adhesive placement too. Basically, don’t get too glue happy. A little can handle the job with just one line of adhesive an inch in from the edges and 3 + marks of adhesive in the middle will do it.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

6. We repeated the whole process all the way around our backsplash, and to cover up any cracks, I sealed with white caulk. You could paint it at this point if you wanted to with primer and a color/sheen of your choosing, but we wanted just clean, simple white.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

That’s it! Game changer, huh? It almost looks like white tile and goes so much better with our countertops. I’m not a huge fan of the slightly green color of the granite, but Robert loves it. And the upkeep of them is still easier than our old concrete countertops, so there’s that.

Maybe one day we’ll replace them, but the jury’s still out. We have a lot of bigger projects to worry about, like our outdated bathrooms. (I’m DYING to show what I have planned with those, but that’s a chat for another day.)

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

Considering this house is a very traditional Colonial, I feel like this backsplash makes so much more sense for that style now. It was just so modern before.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

I have no idea what we’ll do in here later when we replace it with real tile, but I’m so glad this space is feeling more like “us” now. Also, can I freak over the fact that I have a window above our kitchen sink?! I’ve always wanted one! Doing dishes is way more fun when I can stand there and watch Robert and Olivia playing basketball in the driveway. (Well, okay, dishes still aren’t fun but they’re entertaining now. Ya know.)

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

Don’t let this fool you though because the rest of our kitchen is pandemonium 100% of the time. Our shelf nook is always overflowing with random mail that gets dumped there and dishes are usually hanging out on the bar where Olivia eats her breakfast.

I use the “we just moved in” excuse, but, honestly, it’s regular ol’ living life.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

Oh, and if you want to know about any of the random decor on our countertops right now, here’s a whole list:

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

Today marks the official 3 month mark since we closed (and 2 months since we moved in), and I already can’t believe how much it feels like home.

I’m still debating on a few other little changes I could make in here like possibly getting a shade for the window or hanging some plates on that small wall space above it. Maybe get a hanging pendant light above the sink? This is my brain on kitchen decor mode.

What do you think so far? An improvement? Have you done any quickie backsplash changes before too? I’d love to hear all about them!

UPDATE: It has been over 3 years since we completed our DIY backsplash and it is still holding up perfectly! To clean them, we just wipe them down with a damp cloth and they’re good to go. No staining issues at all. 

UPDATE x 2: See our completed budget-friendly kitchen refresh here!

diy backsplash using pressed tin paneling

If you want to save this post for later, you can pin it here:

DIY Pressed Tin Kitchen Backsplash | blesserhouse.com - How to makeover a kitchen backsplash with a pressed tin farmhouse style inexpensively and in 6 hours, no power tools required.

signoff

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the easiest backsplash to install?

Wallpaper and peel and stick vinyl tiles are both very simple DIY backsplash solutions. You can also try beadboard or this faux brick backsplash.

Is a pressed tin backsplash heat resistant?

The PVC backsplash we used is resistant up to 140 degrees F, so if you plan to do this DIY pressed tin backsplash behind your stove, use this real tin paneling instead.

Similar Posts

74 Comments

  1. That is WAYYYY better! I am not a fan of the tiles that were in there. It was too busy for me as well. This is a great solution for now! You and Robert come up with the best ideas!

  2. I love it! Looks so much better than the contemporary backsplash that was installed. Love your creative ideas and style. Keep them coming. =)

  3. This is beautiful. I’ve considered this application in the past but have concerns about putting vinyl behind my stove top because of the heat. I see you have your cooktop on the island. Do you know if these panels are safe to go behind a stove? Thanks!

    1. Thanks, Mailyn! I just did a little digging around and found this response from the manufacturer of the panels: “Even though the backsplash panels are fire-retardant, they can be deformed by excessive heat (over 140 degrees Fahrenheit). The panels can be installed above or behind most stoves. Be sure to keep direct heat sources – toaster ovens, cooking burners, etc., a minimum of 3 inches away from the backsplash panel’s surface.” I hope that helps!

  4. Looks beautiful!! I would love to do this! The house we just purchased also has horrible backsplash with concrete counter-tops

  5. OMGosh! Love it!! I’ve been reading your blog for about a year and a half now… so happy you got your dream house! You guys have done an amazing job making it look like home in such a short time 🙂 Can’t wait to see the rest!

  6. your kitchen/hardware combo is almost identical to mine! (and also makes me want to do this backslash). we have plaster walls in our kitchen though so any DIY’ing scares the crap out of me. We have a dark grey Cesarstone as our counters and I love it from a maintenance perspective. It also gives the look of the concrete without the upkeep which is a definite bonus.

  7. Your kitchen looks wonderful now! The former backsplash just didn’t go with the rest of the vibe. The countertop color is so, so nice. I hope you come to love it as your hubby does. BTW, don’t dare touch the cabinets! The brightness of your kitchen makes me so envious.

  8. Great eye & thank you!!!! Every new kitchen out there it’s like people pick out some beautiful granite and then end up side lining it by putting really fussy back splashes up. This gives it texture and interest without being overwhelming.

  9. I don’t like that type of tile either, so yankin’ it out would have been on my to-do list as well! I like the white much better – clean, simple, and not so busy.
    I’m wondering if in hind-sight, did you conclude that you would have had to prime that tile? Although it’s an easy step and worth it, I’m just curious if , now that it’s up, is that tin transparent enough that you believe you would have seen that colored tile through it??? I guess I’m thinking that tin is thicker, that’s why I’m asking.
    And as far as your kitchen window – I’d so throw a fun pop of color above it!

  10. It’s really uncanny, as just yesterday I received in the mail samples of 3 different designs of pressed tin panels for my kitchen backsplash! I have only seen a few kitchens on Pinterest with this idea, and now here you are showing us all kinds of inspiration! I really like this look 🙂
    I’ve also been wondering if you are missing your IKEA farmhouse style sink, or if you’re ok with the one you currently have….
    Loving watching your new home evolve and always admiring your readiness to take on any reno. Have an awesome day!

  11. I love how it added character but doesn’t compete with the granite! We have similar granite and backsplash decision paralysis has left us without a backsplash for a few years. I think simpler is definitely better!

    1. Hello! I just stumbled across your blog today and holy moly you are making my morning. I am patiently (re: impatiently) waiting for our custom Halcyon Green cabinets to come in and over coffee I decided to google it to see if I could find anyone who had done it before. Girl, you and I were literally deciding between so many of the same colors! We have good taste, clearly! Haha. Anyways- I was dead set on basic white subway tiles but this tin backsplash is GIVING ME LIFE. I am going to have to show the hubs this tonight. Many thanks and fingers crossed. -Brooke

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.